FILMS

The Medieval Parish Churches of Norwich

A church for every week of the year? Today Norwich has 31 medieval parish churches still standing, more than any other city north of the Alps. But many others are known to have existed too, and locating these and dating their appearance and disappearance helps tell Norwich’s unique history.

This short film shows you the location of all the standing and lost churches and how they helped define the landscape of the city over the centuries. From the Black Death to the Reformation and the World War Two, the film will also explain what happened to the lost and ruined churches.

With thanks to the UEA’s Medieval Parish Churches of Norwich Project team who have created this fantastic film as part of their research exploring Norwich’s medieval churches and the relationship between city, community and architecture: www.norwichmedievalchurches.org The UEA is also a project partner in Flintspiration.

Flintspiration – a brief overview

This film is a quick tour of some of Norwich’s medieval churches, featuring Neil Blunt from the Norwich Historic Churches Trust, project director of Flintspiration. The film was made by Jenny Higgins and Dom Thorby with BBC Voices, a media workshop and production unit for film, music and radio based at The Forum in Norwich.

 

St Peter Mancroft

St Peter Mancroft will be the main information hub during the Flintspiration weekend. The church was finished in 1450 and is a splendid example of perpendicular architecture. The film was made by City of Norwich School media students Connor, Robert and Ruth in conjunction with BBC Voices.

St Martin-at-Oak

St Martin-at-Oak is home to the Wharf Academy, which moved to the church in 2012. The Academy offers tuition for piano and singing and the main church hall is used for student showcases and recitals. The film was made by City of Norwich School media students Charlie, Luke and Sarah in conjunction with BBC Voices.

St Gregory

The church of St Gregory lies in the heart of Norwich and is now used as a centre for antiques and collectables. In this film Susan Seddon talks about how it was home to the St Gregory’s orchestra for many years before the 50-60 traders who now use it moved in.  The film was made by City of Norwich School media students Aimee, Georgina, Seb and Shanelle in conjunction with BBC Voices.

Heavenly Gardens

Throughout this celebration weekend, Norwich’s surviving medieval churches will open their doors to visitors. There will also be a number of Heavenly Gardens trails on offer to introduce you to the abundance of nature and wildlife in the churchyards themselves. This film, made by Kieran, Jake and Nick who are Film, TV and Animation students at East Coast College, shows just a few of the surprises you will encounter.

St Mary Coslany

This church on St Mary’s Plain in between Oak Street and Pitt Street is now home to Zaark Books and a number of artists. The books are normally sold online, but at various times during the Flintspiration weekend you will be able to enter and see the vast collection stored here. The film was made by Jamie, Jack and Joseph, who are Film, TV and Animation students at East Coast College.

St Michael Coslany

One of the newest tenants to a City Centre church is Lost in Translation Circus. They have opened up St Michael Coslany as The Oak Circus Centre where they run circus skills training courses alongside rehearsing for their own shows. This film was made by Tia, Jemima and Chelsea who are Film, TV and Animation students at East Coast College, with BBC Voices.